Our Dollar Tree Haul!

10:53:00 AM 0 Comments A+ a-


I have been wanting to put this Dollar Tree Haul for quite a while but I have been so busy with my job, my other blog, and my daughter's soccer games. Thank goodness her season is ending this week but she has decided to take up indoor soccer. That season isn't as time consuming as the outdoor. Every week we head out to Dollar Tree to see what new books they might have. I found three great ones and the were all hardcover!

The first book I found was Crossbones Yard by Kate Rhodes. Introducing Alice Quentin, a London psychologist with family baggage, who finds herself at the center of a grisly series of murders.

Alice Quentin is a psychologist with some painful family secrets, but she has a good job, a good-looking boyfriend, and excellent coping skills, even when that job includes evaluating a convicted killer who's about to be released from prison. One of the highlights of her day is going for a nice, long run around her beloved London--it's impossible to fret or feel guilty about your mother or brother when you're concentrating on your breathing--until she stumbles upon a dead body at a former graveyard for prostitutes, Crossbones Yard.

The dead woman's wounds are alarmingly similar to the signature style of Ray and Marie Benson, who tortured and killed thirteen women before they were caught and sent to jail. Five of their victims were never found. That was six years ago, and the last thing Alice wants to do is to enter the sordid world of the Bensons or anyone like them. But when the police ask for her help in building a psychological profile of the new murderer, she finds that the killer--and the danger to her and the people she cares about--may already be closer than she ever imagined.

The second book I found was Buried on Avenue B by Peter De Jonge.

An edgy and suspenseful noir thriller, Buried on Avenue B traverses the gritty landscape of New York’s Lower East Side and the more sordid corners of Sarasota, Florida, as a gruesome and unexpected discovery in a makeshift Alphabet City grave heats up a 17-year-old cold case.

James Patterson calls Darlene O’Hara “one of the freshest, hippest detective creations in many a year,” and the New York Times has described Peter de Jonge’s writing as “in the noirish, character-driven vein of Dennis Lehane or Michael Connelly.” For fans of serious crime fiction, Peter de Jonge is a must-read, and Detective Darlene O’Hara is cop to be reckoned with.

The third and final book I found was Twelve Drummers Drumming: A Father Christmas Mystery by C. C. Benison.

Father Tom Christmas moves to the picturesque English hamlet of Thornford Regis to become its new vicar and to seek a peaceful haven. But inside the empty village hall, the huge Japanese o-daiko drum that’s featured in the May Fayre festivities has been viciously sliced open—and curled up inside is the bludgeoned body of Sybella Parry, the daughter of the choir director. Realizing this village is not the refuge he’d hoped for, Father Tom comes to a disturbing conclusion: Sybella’s killer must be one of his parishioners. No one is above suspicion—not Sebastian John, the deeply reserved verger, nor Mitsuko Drewe, a local artist, nor Colonel Northmore, survivor of a World War II prison camp. And over all hangs the long-unsolved mystery of a sudden disappearance, one that brought Father Tom to this picture-perfect place to live—or die.


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